Sunday, August 13, 2023

Paris Doorways

 

From Nectarines to doorways

Yesterday Suzanne asked me to repaint the doorway from Provence.

Which got me thinking about Paris’ best doorways. Evidently the most beautiful doorway is at the Petit Palais golden door built especially for the 1900 Exhibition (which I’ve never attempted to paint ๐ŸŽจ). No wonder.

I did draw the doorway of l’Hรดtel de Chenizot for the l’รŽle Saint Louis map

Also considered one of Paris’ most beautiful doorway. I see I successfully misspelled CHENZIOT in my usual dyslexic fashion ๐Ÿ™„

The Rococo Neptune-themed relief work on this doorway at 51, rue 
Saint-Louis-en-l'Ile is spectacular.

It’s almost impossible to photograph the full doorway in all its glory, much less draw it. The street is simply too narrow. Sometimes the
doorway is open. Anyone can walk into the courtyard, which is not so impressive.

FYI, 
The Rococo style began in France in the 1730s as a reaction against the more formal and geometric Louis XIV style. It was known as the "style Rocaille", or "Rocaille style". And usually features scallop shells, gorgons, Neptune and other underwater themes.

I once did a Rococo Christmas Paris letter! Believe me, you cannot live in Paris without becoming somewhat Rococo-ized. You’re surrounded.

The same goes for Art Nouveau in Paris. Another beautiful top Paris doorway is at 29, Avenue Rapp, 7th arrondissement. By designed
 in 1901 by architect Jules Lavirotte.

This door I drew f
or the Art Nouveau Paris map ๐Ÿ—บ️

You cannot imagine my surprise recently, over dinner when Art historian, Rosemary informed me,
“Oh that’s the famous ‘Penis Door’!” ๐Ÿคญ 
I looked again. It was obvious ๐Ÿ˜‚

My next door neighbor has a beautiful, historic doorway I’m determined to paint.

The chimera, hidden in shadow, protects les portes cochรฉres/carriage doors ๐Ÿšช Supposedly a chimera is a mythological monster made up of various animal parts. But she/he seems rather angelic to me.

My personal favorite doorway, but not famous, is at 21, boulevard Saint Germain, 75005.

Thanks to Google Maps this is the first time I’ve seen the full doorway. It was built in 1881- 1882 by Arte Nouveau architect Jean-Marie Boussard.

The Caryatid sculptures are after supporting the porch of the Erechthelon, Athens Greece. 

Can I just show you this stunning lion door ornament?

And a lion door knocker on the รŽle?
By the way, it is a big deal to change the color of a front door. Certainly on Ile Saint Louis. You need the approval of le syndic of each building. It can take weeks to months.
Have you fallen back to sleep ๐Ÿ’ค yet PBers? 
Is Sunday becoming boring history day at PB? (SBHD)
What? No desserts?
Do you have a favorite Paris doorway๐Ÿšช? Please do tell ๐Ÿ™
❤️Bon Dimanche PBers ❤️
WAIT! This Sundays is Paris Kayak Day!!

47 comments:

  1. Linda Karber2:09 AM

    What a beautiful map! I can almost taste the baguette, roasted chicken, and ice cream! Thank you Carol, you have made my day.

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    1. Anonymous6:48 AM

      You’re making me salivate ๐Ÿ˜‹

      Delete
  2. Anonymous4:41 AM

    I like your take on history, you make it manageable. I haven’t heard the term carriage doors before.. Were they designed to let in horse-drawn carriages when fully open? Lydia

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    1. Anonymous4:46 AM

      Exactly Lydia ๐Ÿ‘
      I hadn’t heard it either before, thous my house has them ๐Ÿ™„
      There is a horse stable too, now someone’s living quarters of course.
      I wish we still had horses ๐ŸŽ

      Delete
  3. Adrien Bray6:52 AM

    Doors are my favourite thing! Paris and everywhere ๐Ÿ˜ Maybe it is the symmetry or the thought of what lies behind...je ne sais quoi!

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    1. Anonymous10:34 AM

      The colorful doors do stand out here.
      The contrast with the neutral colored stone walls is INTENSE.

      Delete
  4. Anonymous7:35 AM

    I love looking at doors and architecture. Th colors of the doors, the bright blues and greens are lovely. The bright colors look so lovely against the soft stone or stucco. And the door knockers! Some are really funny! Beth

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    1. Anonymous10:32 AM

      The colors are especially strong & bright in such a grey city.

      Delete
  5. My personal favorite doors in Paris are nothing special or fancy. The old blue doors on my friend Jerry's former apartment on Rue du Temple, right past the Jewish Museum, north of Rambuteau (I think north -- walking away from BHV) was a favorite that I did try to paint (not well; I'm better now). A favorite only because for several weeks they were MY doors, too! And once Rick sent me on a quest to find 48 Rue du Rome in the music district because some famous publisher of guitar music had lived there or had his shop there back in the day (which wasn't our day). You are inspiring me to look at all the door photos I've taken over time and try my hand!

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    1. Anonymous10:31 AM

      I will look for Jerry’s blue door next time I’m up that way Jeanie. (I was there this week!)
      I just Google Mapped 48 rue de Rome - it’s a piano store ๐ŸŽต
      Definitely try your hand ๐ŸŽจ

      Delete
  6. The doors are definitely eye candy in Paris.I see familiar ones:)

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  7. Not a logical transition from nectarines to doorways but a great post! It’s fun looking at the various styles and and colors of the doors. I love a red door! I also love to look at the balconies and see how they are styled. Have a great week.๐Ÿ—ผ❤️

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    1. Anonymous10:13 AM

      Oh you reminded me Ga!
      I forgot about what a big deal it is to change the color of a door…certainly on the Ile Saint Louis. You need the approval of le syndic of each building.
      It can take weeks to months.

      Delete
  8. Heather A Toronto, Canada8:51 AM

    It is wonderful to see this morning’s blog. One of my favourite things to photograph is the doors in Paris. We purchased two brass door knockers at antique shops or markets in France, one of which was the famous lion and the other a lovely smaller round one with a beautiful woman’s face. We had to leave the lion behind when we sold our house a year ago and I gave the other one to a friend in Quebec so I know it has a good home. Your Sunday posts are never boring and I look forward to them.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Anonymous10:08 AM

      Thanks Heather in Toronto ❤️ for letting me know
      I wonder if BHV downstairs in their brick a brac department doesn’t have these types of ornaments - I will take a look next time ๐Ÿ‘

      Delete
  9. Anonymous9:38 AM

    Paris doors are incredibly beautiful! I took many photos on my one trip there.

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    1. Anonymous10:09 AM

      There must be a club of Paris door collectors.
      Many European cities have exceptional doors ๐Ÿšช

      Delete
  10. Anonymous10:05 AM

    Love your doorways and the knockers!!! So many interesting and ornate details!!๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿฅฐ๐Ÿ’–Thank you for this beautiful share! LC

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  11. Anonymous10:28 AM

    My favorite door is very personal. You walked through it with me. 52 Avenue de Goblin in the 13th. Such fond memories of our year in Paris! Thank you for being a part of those memories. PS Our door was red then! I'll search for a picture!

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    1. Anonymous10:48 AM

      ☺️
      Try this Google Map link:
      https://goo.gl/maps/GAjLzjDzT3fE1Mvv7
      And I still have the much adored kitchen rug with the forks and spoons๐Ÿด you gave me ๐Ÿ‘

      Delete
  12. Anonymous10:42 AM

    Lovely post and watercolors today. I'm sure you will recognize my favorite doorway (and house) in Paris, because it is right down the street from Sennelier. 13 quai Voltaire is a very narrow and splendid building with your Rococo elements. It has been recently restored, and is an absolute jewel. I'm so curious to know who owns it, and if the interior has been made as stunning as its exterior.

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    1. Anonymous11:04 AM

      Thank you!
      I did not know this building at #13 quai Voltaire, 75007
      I rarely go north of Sennelier. Big mistake
      More here on Hotel Pioust de Saint Gilles the narrowest building in Paris (in French easily translated). It was previously printing offices.
      https://goo.gl/maps/DRUrKJZ73VsVLrGW6

      Delete
    2. Oh, thank you for finding the name of the building. Will look for more of its history!

      Delete
  13. Anonymous11:10 AM

    You did it! I think almost everyone loves the doors in Paris!!! I am bringing my 18 yr old granddaughter to Paris in the Summer of 2023. Any suggestions where we should visit? Can we visit you for an art lesson?
    Any suggestions from your fan club on this page????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous11:53 AM

      Hahahahaha
      Can we talk next year?
      I love giving watercolor lessons ๐ŸŽจ

      Delete
  14. Anonymous11:12 AM

    Oooops, I meant the Summer of 2024!!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Anonymous11:44 AM

    I always learn something new when you share Paris history with us Carol. Love all the photos of the Paris doors. I also love my painting so much! Merci! - Suzanne P

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    1. Anonymous11:51 AM

      Thank YOU Suzanne ❤️ for he doorway idea ๐Ÿ‘
      I was wondering whether to post this morning at 6:30 am !

      Delete
  16. Anonymous11:50 AM

    This was fun and those doorways are just gorgeous Lynne

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  17. Anonymous12:26 PM

    I love the tall green door at Musee Marmottan. Wish I could post an image here. I painted it in watercolor and pen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous2:41 PM

      Forest green is a favorite door color along with French blue.

      Delete
  18. Bonnie L12:40 PM

    No doubt about it, Paris architecture is astounding. Who needs to visit museums?! Just look around you. Sigh…Paris is so full…of everything beautiful…of life! ❤️

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    1. Anonymous2:42 PM

      Exactly! And you don’t need a reservation. Just good walking shoes ๐Ÿ‘Ÿ

      Delete
  19. Anonymous2:04 PM

    I LOVE interesting doors and doorways! I have a collection of photos from all over the world. Some are very elegant and some are very rustic, but all serve as a passage way to another world. ;) Keep up the good work!

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    1. Anonymous2:39 PM

      What a joyous thing to do ! ☺️

      Delete
  20. sukicart2:22 PM

    I think one could spend a lifetime exploring the doors of Paris - no way could I ever pick a favorite.

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  21. Anonymous2:31 PM

    On my last visit, my camera was clicking as I oogled the gates, doors and grand archways over the entrances! ....and the hardware is gorgeous too. Like all of Paris, it's a delicious feast for the eyes. Versailles had an abundant source of door eye candy as well! Thank you for letting us follow you around on your daily life in this amazing city!

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    1. Anonymous2:40 PM

      Yes ironwork was developed to very high art.

      Delete
  22. Such a wonderful post! Magical Paris doors!

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  23. Anonymous4:25 AM

    Beautiful doorways. I love your historical bits AWA Catering

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  24. Anonymous8:24 AM

    Patricia Nash handbags had a line out that is Italian Doors, Seems like you could collaborate with her and do a French line, that I would be up for!

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    1. Anonymous12:29 PM

      Very cute idea ๐Ÿ‘

      Delete
  25. Anonymous10:00 AM

    Whenever I go to Paris or any other city in France, I take pictures of doors. Your post has been perfect for I went to Paris last month and kept making pictures of green doors, don't ask me why. Maybe it is because I love green or because I love Paris old doors. Thanks for the post. C'est magnifique.

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  26. I loved this post! The Paris buildings are lovely but the doors are spectacular and so different from one another.

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    1. Anonymous12:26 PM

      Thank you Joel ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ™๐Ÿคธ๐Ÿพ‍♀️

      Delete
  27. Anonymous3:23 PM

    A great pleasure! Merci! Love, Louise

    ReplyDelete

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