Monday, November 12, 2012

Le Bonbon au Palais

 Have you been to visit Monsieur Candy Man in Paris?
It's a must-do you know...

 People think the heart of France is made of fromage/cheese just because there are 365 varieties. But this is not the case. In fact there are 600+ kinds of regional candies and each and every candy is dearly loved and it's tradition cherished.

 Step into Monsieur Candy's classroom at Le Bonbon au Palais
19 rue Monge 75005 Metro Cardinal Lemoine
Open Tuesday - Saturday, 11am - 7:30pm
 Arrive openminded and be prepared to learn taste.

 I went off to Nancy looking for the gelifie Bergamotte I tasted at Le Bonbon. Professor Georges sets me straight. I should have traveled up to Thionville for his heavenly gels. Hmmm...

 1st question of the day - name the best caramels in Paris?
Jacques Genin mango caramels?

 Non non non!
In just 3 shops in Paris you'll find Le Negus de Nevers.

 The Prof pops one into my mouth and commands I do NOT bite down. Just let it melt. Heaven! How come I dated a mec from Nevers and he never said boo about these caramels? Hmmm...

 Visiting Le Bonbon is like tasting a flight of fine wines. Next up Georges offers a small chocolate square with dried cherries embedded from Lyon - a simple mendient like I've never seen before. The dark chocolate is intense and contrasts perfectly with the sharpness of the cherries.

 Next up an unimpressive looking red ball - another cherry this time enrobed first in milk chocolate and then...oh I forget. Why didn't I take notes? But it is wonderful!

 My turn to ask a question - what's Georges favorite guimauve/marshmellow. These are both the best of the best but smaller perveyor, Guy Augier is his favorite - it's slightly sweeter. Ah ha.

 Georges points out these 2 small jars of jelly and says they are a must-taste - Confitures a La Lorraine.
Take them home and do NOT smear on bread. Simply taste with a teaspoon comme ca. Oh...

 These jellies are known as the 'caviar of the Lorraine'. Made from red and white currents/groiseilles the seeds are hand removed with a goose feather/la plume d'oie. There are no words to describe how extraordinary these taste. Their production dates back to 1344. Marie Stuart, queen of Scots in 1559 was fond of these pearls of red current it is noted.

 Every single one of the 200+ French candies and jams here has a history and fascinating story to go with.

 Look under the jars and pots of candy and you'll notice ingenious decor, all hand made by Georges in a matter of months.

 This tall stack of encyclopedias holds pots of lollies/sucettes. They mirror Georges' encyclopedic knowledge of France's candies.

 Outside it's raining cats and dogs and none are made of reglisse/licorice.

Oh why didn't I buy a chocolate umbrella inside?
Do visit Georges and Le Bonbon au Palais.
Be prepared to be surprised and delighted.

22 comments:

  1. tres charmante histoire!
    must try these CARAMELS!!

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  2. what a winsome post - merci Carol pour encore une experience douce de la France!

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  3. Lucinda7:31 AM

    LOVE your candy man!!
    very witty
    :)

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  4. Lovely post!!! I´d like to spend a night inside the store, like a Night at the Museum :)
    I can´t believe the chocolate umbrellas are the same! Those were our childhood candies here in Argentina
    Thanks!

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  5. The umbrellas are so cute..remind me of my youth.

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  6. Mango caramels? Jacques Genin, here I come!
    (Faints, and then books a flight to Paris)

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  7. Caramels, chocolates, and marshmallows--oh my! Thank you for such a sweet post. ;) I return to Paris in a few months (too long a wait for me) and my list of places to visit grows by the minute thanks to you! :) I will definitely pick up some of those caramels. Katie

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  8. I'm a chocolate lover, but you converted me after seeing all those bon-bons. You must have been there ALL day ! so many to see & then all the tasting you had to go through.Wonderful post thanks. Barbara

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    Replies
    1. So funny!
      I went to Le Bonbon in the evening after spending the day at the chocolate salon at the chateau
      No wonder I'm pooped!

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  9. Thank heavens for Amazon and my coquellicots! The only way I could get through this post...and even with help, I just barely made it. No, I didn't make it: I'm going out now in search of sweets!

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    Replies
    1. The coquelicot makers told me they are really good for sore throats/mal a la gorge!
      or did I say that already...
      Yummy medicine

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  10. Oh my!! I am so enjoying your trip! France and fabulous bonbons - could it get any better? (I hope Bear has recovered from his encounter with Biff.)
    Meanwhile, here where I live, there's 6" of snow on the ground and the high temps are below freezing. Needless to say, I'd rather be in Paris! Instead, I'll make myself a nice cup of chocolat chaud and look forward to your next post.

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  11. I did remember your past post and DID stop in here while I was in Paris!
    The caramels from Brittany were wonderful. The small bag of marshmallow-type things was a bit strange - both to me and my French friend. T
    he store is a delight, however, and I will certainly be back!!
    Definitely worth a stop.
    Thanks for the tip.

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  12. PS
    I remembered to get my purchases gift wrapped.
    He does a gorgeous job...so much better than Deyrolle (disappointing).

    BTW, "bom bom" means rear end in Portuguese. The words are "bom bom" and "bundas." There is even a magazine in Brazil called "bundas!"

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  13. Hahahaha
    the nickname for Brazil is 'Grande Bunda'
    I went 5x
    my teeny Brazilian bikini comes from the bum bum shop :)

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  14. now that is an assortment of exquisite candy! so marvelous! :)
    http://www.averysweetblog.com/

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  15. This is ONE SWEEEEET Post! Très sucré! Carol, you are still in France? This seems like a terrific reserach trip! The top drawing~you are expanding your style, n'est-ce pas? Moi, just got back from la ville de Québec..thought of you when I saw macarons, especially at the indoor Marché de Vieux Québec...I'll probably post a few journal pages from the trip...Anyway, amuse-toi bien, R.

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  16. Brenda1:06 AM

    It is always like you take us through a tiny magical door and show us a snipet of heaven.
    I have passed that candy shop many times on my walks and at first thought he was selling small soaps in wonderful bottles, but now I know better.
    Next time...

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  17. That looks like a very fun store!
    I like your night shot of the exterior, especially.

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  18. What a fabulous store! There are so many wonderful delights of Pars- and France...

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  19. A very nice posting!

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  20. Anonymous9:11 PM

    In Paris it makes a huge diference if you know where to go. This article on the lolly shop or sweets store (Australian language) is exceptional. Everything is so expensive (per 100 grams) but you convey the dedication and finesse of the confectionery in such a way that it makes sense to target a place like this and budget accordingly. It's all so very French. Congratulations. Gwendoline in Australia.

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