Wednesday, August 29, 2012

K comme Kilos

100 grs., original watercolor,9" x 11"
Today we are going to tackle the complex subject of macaron math.


Walk into any Parisien patisserie and you're instantly dazzled by the array of colors.

And the multiple array of flavors or parfums. Your first thought is how many and which ones to choose. Correct?


You look at the price and come down to earth with a thump. 66.00 Euros! You run out of the shop tearing your hair and shrieking.
 
Here is where a little macaron math comes to the rescue. This will indeed help you when buying anything in France. You MUST learn the difference between kilos and grams.

By the way these macarons ("individual") are sold by the piece. You'll pay a different price in you eat them sur place (on the spot) or for emporter (take it away) if there's a tea salon onsite.

Here's where a little math can help.
1 kilo = 1000 grams
or
1 kilos = 2.2 pounds
Buy 100 grs and get 3.3 ounces or 4-6 macarons depending on the size.

66.00 the kilo
6.60 the 100 grams
Just move the decimal point over one.
A managable amount without costing an arm and a leg.
Two+ 'minis' are about equal to one bigger individual macarons previously mentioned.



Many patisseries have ready-made packs of 100 grs waiting for you, so put away your calculators and start munching. Usually you can choose the flavors you prefer. If the box is a designer or limited edition box you'll pay more by the way. Fancy boxes are not free, ahem.

 For your edification:
1 kilo of macarons = usually about 70 macarons.
The exception is Pierre Herme macarons, where I was proudly informed a kilo = is 60 macarons
Their macarons are FATTER.
(I got this from a reliable source).
Say after me please, san gram (cent gram-100g)

Todays is a repost since my Paris blobs didn't come out so hot. It happens.
MERCI et BONJOUR!

17 comments:

  1. My math skills most certainly improved when I started cooking and shopping for food by weight in France. This is a GREAT post, Carol. mmmmmmmacarons.
    Connie*

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  2. Wow..you are good..we are on the metric system forever..and my mind still goes to the British/US system! Imagine..

    Maybe your blobs are not pleasing you but how sweet is that scale and macarons?It's lovely.

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  3. Thank you for the lesson :)
    I love your pics!

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  4. Carol, this post is a great one, the second time around or not!
    I love to repeat your lessons (as long as there's no 3-hour exam)! ;-)

    Sorry about your Parisian blobs. I am sure when you finally decide they are good enough, there will be splendid ones!

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  5. Lucinda6:57 PM

    So buying a macaron in Paris is not a piece of cake!
    Who knew?

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  6. laurie7:21 PM

    Please do one of your photo essays on French children getting ready for school (la rentrée). They are not all practicing to be fashionistas...think of Marie Curie and Marguerite Duras.
    I can hazard a guess that those two weren't worried if their red shoes and red dresses didn't match.
    Hmmm as you often say

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    Replies
    1. Laurie,
      it would be so much easier if I was in Paris not NYC!
      Hmmm
      Thanks

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  7. That's all fine - as far as it goes. But if the baker is carrying a tray of macs to the display case and he starts from the oven, which is 75 feet away from the case, and he moseys along at 30 miles per hour, and the customer enters the bakery from the front door, and walks toward the bakery case, which is 15 feet away, at 45 miles per hour (distracted by the many goodies in the window), where will the two of them meet? Do I have to convert to metric to get the answer?

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  8. I think I would starve over there. :)I flunked Math. But I know Lovely paintings when I see them tho, and that yours is.

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  9. Carol, I love math, and wish that I was now as flexible in my calculations as in days of yore.

    I guess that even now I still keep some vintage calculator going upstairs in my aging brain.

    It's fun to spot the sweet spot of a bargain, but also pretty wonderful to just find the sweet spot that you really, truly want to taste.

    xo

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  10. Love this post. I will look this up on your blog when I finally get to Paris! :)

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  11. ... great tutorial ... again .. cheers for you !!!

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  12. Sooo, is take away cheaper than eating them on the spot?

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    Replies
    1. If there is a seating area, everything always costs a bit more if you sit down rather than 'emporter'/take-away you item.
      In a cafe tables outside vs. tables inside vs. sitting/standing at the bar all effect the price of your Coka.

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  13. And thank you so much for not making me prove that I'm not a robot! Those things make me crazy.

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  14. Great post, Carol. Now this is the reason why I was drawn to making my own macarons. I can eat as many grs or kilos of them without worrying about the cost!

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  15. This is HILARIOUS - learning the metric system through Macarons. I love it! You're a kick!

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