Wednesday, January 11, 2012

The Renaissance Portrait

 Early December I got to see the Met's new Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini show, up until March 18th. Over 160 works are represented in media ranging from bronze medals, marble busts, illuminated manuscripts, drawings and tempera on wood.
 Bear was thrilled to see a distant relative hanging...
 Near a Da Vinci portrait drawing...
 And not far from a Bellini portrait lent from the museum in Padua...
 This Botticelli of 'Simonetta Vespucci' is visiting from Berlin...
 One of the only two existant tempera on wood  paintings (1444) by Pisanello of Leonello d'Este is lent by the Accademia of Bergamo...
 Fra Filippo Lippi's man and woman at a casement window (1440) was possibly commissioned for the occasion of a betrothal...
 Clearly there are many rare and beautiful portraits in this exquisite exhibition. Here 'Selvaggio Sassetti', a banker's daughter painted by Ghirlandaio (ca. 1487-88).
 Sculpture busts mirror the paintings...
 Did the show's curator have a hand in choosing these look-alike busts?
The many dated bronze portrait metals assist in dating and identifying all the portraits of the time - this one by Pisanello  (1441-42).
 Miniature portraits for travel...
  Red abounds. Was it because scarlet fabric was rare and reserved only for rulers and aristocrats?
 Do wear red when you visit the Met Renaissance Portrait show.
Don't miss it!

21 comments:

  1. I so wish I could see this exhibit! Thanks for the reportage and congratulations to Bear for his historical portrait! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. The picture of the curator and the busts is too funny. I love bear's portrait, though!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Bear certainly deserves to hang at the Met.
    Looks like a lovely exhibit!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Marie2:47 PM

    Wonderful exhibition; I do wish I could see it!!
    ~Marie

    ReplyDelete
  5. You are so lucky to be so close to museums to see all these wonderful shows. I am so glad you share with us so we can at least see some of it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. OH! I am pea green! Thank you though! I am sending my niece who is off to NYU on Friday!
    Merci!!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Bear's da Vinci-esque relative and the curator's profile have just had me choking on my wine with laughter - priceless!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. It should not be a surprise ,as one can see by his bearing that Bear has aristocratic background. Perhaps the curator is related to the subjects of the busts?
    I love seeing the detail of the textiles in these portraits! Thanks again for taking me to this exhibit via PB!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Really love the pictures.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wonderful ! I like the "Renaissance Teddy Bear" :)

    Nice day !

    ReplyDelete
  11. You are singing my song! Tempera on wood is such a treasure! This is a very strong exhibition! Jealous!!!

    Theresa

    ReplyDelete
  12. The sketch of Bear is terrific :)
    I like the curator & the sculpture, too.
    I was in the museum in Bergamo many years ago - in Italy there is so much art to see!

    ReplyDelete
  13. carol smith11:06 PM

    I'm missing my January daily "mailings". What's happened? I tryed to resubcribe but "they" say I'm already on the list.

    carolsmi2001@yahoo.com

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  14. Check your spam mail Carol Smith. Mine have all of a sudden been going to my spam. I have no clue why.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Nobody can paint a profile or porcelain, glowing skin like a Renaissance master.

    Beautiful, a favorite period of art.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Oh how I love your shot of the curator, and the drawing of bear! In Australia we have a Renaissance exhibition on in Canberra at the moment, that I'm hoping to get to. I hope it's as fun as yours- although our galleries are stuffy and don't let you take photos.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Carol, that Met show is rather wonderful and well worth more than one visit.

    I admit that when I first saw the three profile portraits in turban head wraps, I was reminded of that character in the Harry Potter story and film who had two faces.

    Bear would never be considered to be two-faced. He is quite uniquely himself.

    I didn't have time to see the caricature show, so definitely need to get back to the Met again very soon.

    xo

    ReplyDelete
  18. Louise:
    our galleries are just as stuff about photo shots - I was at a 'press preview' so I could take all I wanted and practically kiss the sculptures :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I looked twice at your 'Photo critique' because its so interesting; The Baker's daughter's father must have sold pastry to the King to commission such a portrait. and a Botticelli.
    SIGH!
    xxx
    julie

    ReplyDelete
  20. excuse moi. Banker's daughter. Now I understand.....
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  21. Sweet Freak,
    How I wish I could keep up with your cupcake adventures so we're even.

    ReplyDelete

Love hearing what you think