Monday, March 05, 2012

Cahier d'Ecriture

 I'm always on the lookout for examples of French cursive to bring home.

 I love this postcard by illustrator Claire Franek.

 My attempts at her delightful curvy handwriting, ahem

 More Fr cursive practice.
 Lurve the handwriting on Chez L'Amie Jean's biz card - easy to bring home.

 Big fruitbox with nice writing - not easy to bring home.

 Adorable bonbon/candy jar - too cumbersome to bring home.

 Page ripped from Lenotre's catalog - easy to bring home. Shhh-they keep them by the cash register.

 I Love the handwriting on Michel et Augustin's yogurts.There was a promotion at La Grande Epicerie and I happened to sit at a communal table where Michel et Augustin were eating lunch. I was dying to say I LOVE your packaging, but the cat got my tongue.
Go figure.

 You can find plenty kid's how-to-write French cursive on Amazon.fr and FNAC for kids #19 rue Vavin.

 I bought this cahier/notebook at L'Ecritoire but it's a counting book.

An important ardoise/blackboard

Announces gouter/snacktime 3-6pm

I won't forget this handwriting in Paris.

23 comments:

  1. Sweet images! I love the whimsical quality of a lot of those, Carol!

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  2. Bonjour Carol. Once again, these take me back to the days of my childhood. I wish I could still write like this, but have to be honest: I don't think I could pull off the French cursive that successfully anymore... Veronique (French Girl in Seattle)

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  3. Carol I love the French Cursive! So unique and yes, some very whimsical!

    Xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  4. I just LOVE your drawing of les jeunes filles. Super!

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  5. Your handwriting samples and your fashion sketches are perfect! I think you've mastered the Frenchy writing, with a whimsical "Carol" touch added.

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  7. I suddenly wonder about the cursive script I was taught in elementary school - much different form this one, not so rounded, more narrow and slanty. I never realized there are different "fonts" even in regular handwriting instruction.
    If only the "prove you're not a robot" words were written in French script!

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  8. So adorable, you have spoiled me rotten with all those French handwriting samples, I don't even remember if I can write still!

    I can't find any handwriting in your last picture, I confess. Alas, I have eaten a French-size slice of the raspberry tart while you were looking for more handwriting samples. *smile*

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  9. Jeanette:
    I had nothing to do with the new illegible Blogger capchas.
    They were sprung on us overnite.
    Hopefully some will raise a ruckus and they will disappear overnite as well.
    Here's hoping.

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  10. We should import this idea of the "gouter" at once! I heard Michelle Obama say in a health forum her family only eats desserts on weekends and that it's a "sometimes treat." I adore something sweet regularly.

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  11. Jeanette,
    the "Palmer Method" is not the same as French grade school cursive.
    no way!

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  12. Very witty post, Carol.
    Cute drawings!
    I like the yogurt ad - the cow is great :)

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  13. Great post, Carol.
    Maybe it's because there's so much writing, but the images as I scrolled through lent a grand feeling of "airiness" to it all.
    Wonderful!

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  14. Fun! I would love to write like these! Unfortunately my writing isn't so cute. Ah well, something to aspire to!
    Great post!

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  15. Love the French kiddie having her afternoon snack of a cookie and a cup of chocolate..
    Adorbs

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  16. Carol, I hope you can find this Japanese book in NYC, it shows how to write cursive French! Kat

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  17. I love that second postcard. I think you do a very good job copying the cursive writing. I love the way they do the R's. You can tell what they are and that they don't look like n's..and I do wish they would drop that 'not a robot' weird writing too.

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  18. My former French professeur, a francophile would say: C'est tres magnifique! Her name is Judith Jeon-Chapman of Holden, MA. College professor, speaker of four languages and takes student's abroad. I think last June of 2010 if not 2011.

    Nothing I do online is copyrighted, open to more scrutiny. The post cartes d'inscript are lovely.

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  19. Bonjour Carol,
    I learned French privately and then at L'Institut Francais d' Athens. Much of my first year of French at L' Institut but tellingly some part here and there of the following years till I graduated was spent learning French calligraphy. I love it. I cannot write any other way. So well illustrated!Thank you, Carol!

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  20. Anonymous8:26 AM

    My five-year old granddaughter started learning the lettres attachées in Senior Kindergarten at the Lycée in Toronto. It can be done!

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  21. L'Ami Jean? Wow. That was our local when Antoine and I lived around the corner there for 5 years. LOVE that place. Didn't realise they'd gone all curly wurly since. Och, I do wish I could write like that so have to live through my daughters. Great post, Carol.

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  22. As a designer, I LOVE and appreciate the cursive handwriting. I miss it. So much is done on the computer these days.

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  23. As a designer, I LOVE and greatly appreciate handwriting. Most type on signs or whatever are done on the computer these days. Such a nice relief to see the "hand" involved....

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