Thursday, February 23, 2012

Stuff Parisians Like

 Bad enough the proliferation of endless Paris cupcakes...
 Do English words displayed prominently stop you in your tracks?
 Expert Parisian Oliver Magny explains in Stuff Parisians Like.
 Have you seen these signs in the Metro? Evidently it's tres cool to sprinkle English words in your conversation if you're Parisian especially in biz.
Example from Olivier Magny:
'il est en speed car il a squeeze un gros meeting entre lunch avec son boss et un conf call avec son CEO'/he is late because he scheduled a big meeting between a lunch with his boss and a conference call with the CEO.
 Here parfume Annick Goutal throws in a few english words 'Roses so Chic'. Is it for our benefit or the Frenchies? The latter is my guess...
 The cupcake word at patisserie Berko...
 This cheesecake creation looks more Parisian than New Yorkaise non?
 Stars and stripes are OK for the French though les Americains may be vraiment des gros beaufs', ahem. Olivier says 'for Parisians, every person he does not know is a beauf'.
Il y a beaucoup de snob in Paris IMHO.
 Message T-shirts? Usually in English.
 A witty compartmental purse...
 tres cool!
 Here's a chance to practice your Parisian expressions.
 My Little Paris provides a video to 'Ce que disent les Parisiens'. Do come back and tell me what they're saying. I haven't a clue.
Here's some New York Francaise revenge!

21 comments:

  1. Lucinda11:57 AM

    il est le meilleur bon en Paris

    c'est genial!

    Enorme!

    c'est claire!

    c'est gents c'est stressee (?)

    OK ciao ciao ciao

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  2. Well, I guess it makes sense--after all, we sprinkle french-isms into our speech, oui? I'd love to hear them saying these, though. Fun..

    I love your little garcon with his cowlick, and the elegant m'lle he's serving, Carol...

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  3. It's funny, if I were traveling Paris, I would have thought that any english words would be a way to attract tourists which for me would be red flags to stay away.

    Interesting post!

    The Wanderfull Traveler

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  4. Anonymous12:37 PM

    I hate to say it but on my last day in Paris, I had dinner at a restaurant on the Place de la Republique that was called Le Buffalo Grill. It was the French version of a country-western saloon down to the sawdust on the floor and a bowl of popcorn on the table. Bonjour pardner!
    Stephan

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  5. Nice welcoming sights for English speakers! :-)

    P.S.:
    What's with those word verifications?
    Almost impossible to jump over them.

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  6. Tu aimes vraiment Paris .

    belle soirée

    manon

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  7. Wasn't there a movement to eliminate "Franglais" recently? And who was behind it? Obviously not succeeding!

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  8. Hi Carol, where did you see that spotted scarf? I must have it! :)

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  9. Emma:
    the polka-dot scarf?
    No idea at all
    je suis desolee

    Jeanette:
    L'Académie française has no say when it comes to biz men using Franglais malheureusement :(
    c'est comme ca

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  10. Very interesting..here in QC..we have many English words in French also..not always appropriate..Saw a good movie you might like on Netflix..

    Kristin Scott Thomas..I've Loved You So Long..French w/ English subs..

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  11. Even when the French speak English it sounds very French.. Its the Accent. I love hearing it. I also love those red and white stripe chairs under Jetlag.

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  12. Very cute! I'd feel more at home in Paris with a few familiar words sprinkled about - I like it :)

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  13. Hi Carol,

    Lovely post, I've read the book by Monsieur Magny too. Truly an eye opener on Parisian life. I'm gonna be reviewing it for my blog once I've finished the last chapter.

    Thanks always for your Parisian insights. Love it!

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  14. Great post as always. I'd seen the Wall St English ads on the Metro on my last visit- they caught my eye every time, and made me wonder.

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  15. I cracked up in French class when we learned that the French word for jogging was ... "le jogging."

    So now when I go out for a run, I say I'm going "le jogging" and feel so French. Until I start to sweat...

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  16. We had a good laugh about Jet Lag on Genie's blog. I told her I got sleepy just thinking about that place. I can still LOL at Learn Wall Street English. I don't even want to know what kind of language that might be these days!
    V

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  17. I have taken several snaps on the Métro of the Learn Wall Street English posters. They are hilarious... ahem, I think that we have an expat friend who teaches at LWSE.

    These days on Wall Street there is probably a lot of swearing...

    Thanks for the link.

    Bises,
    Genie

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  18. Anonymous6:22 PM

    could somebody please transcribe the video "ce que disent les parisiens"?

    They speak far too quickly for me to understand.

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  19. Amazing your post! Mac Do has just begun a new ad at the subway stations: "Venez comme vous êtes"... American French style!

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  20. MacDo will soon be selling baguette-burgers made by Laduree/Paul along with the Laduree/Mont Blanc macarons according to the WSJ.
    AHEM!

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  21. Anonymous8:07 PM

    "Sea, Sex and Sun" is a funky Serge Gainsbourg tune. From later in his career, it highlights his charmingly naughty, and indeed, brilliant song styling...

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